M4 Carbine

M4 Carbine

The M4 Carbine is a 5.56×45mm NATO, air-cooled, gas-operated, direct impingement, magazine-fed carbine. It has a 14.5 in (370 mm) barrel and a telescoping stock. It is essentially a lighter and shorter variant of the M16A2 assault rifle.

The M4 is extensively used by the United States Armed Forces and is largely replacing the M16 rifle in United States Army and United States Marine Corps combat units as the primary infantry weapon and service rifle. The M203 and M320 grenade launchers can be mounted on the lower hand guard of the carbine (see where bipod is attached on the photo). The distinctive step in its barrel is for mounting the M203 with the standard hardware. The M4 has semi-automatic and three-round burst firing modes (like the M16A2 and M16A4), while the M4A1 has semi-automatic and fully automatic firing modes (like the M16A1 and M16A3).

Design

The M4 and its variants fire 5.56×45mm NATO (and .223 Remington) ammunition, and are gas-operated, magazine-fed, selective fire firearms with either a multi-position telescoping stock or a fixed A2 or LE tactical stock.

The M4 is a shorter and lighter variant of the M16A2 rifle, with 80% parts commonality. The M4 is similar to much earlier compact M16 versions, such as the 1960s-era XM177 family. Some of those visual similarities are obvious in both weapons.

As with many carbines, the M4 is handy and more convenient to carry than a full-length rifle. The price is slightly inferior ballistic performance compared to the full-size M16, with its 5.5″ (14 cm) longer barrel. This becomes most apparent at ranges of 200 yards (180 m) and beyond.

While the M4’s maneuverability makes it a candidate for non-infantry troops (vehicle crews, clerks and staff officers), it also makes it ideal for close quarters battle (CQB). The M4, along with the M16A4, have mostly replaced the M16A2 in the Army and Marines. The U.S. Air Force, for example, has transitioned completely to the M4 for Security Forces squadrons, while other armed personnel retain the M16A2. The US Navy uses M4A1s for Special Operations and vehicle crews.

Some features of the M4 and M4A1 compared to a full-length M16-series rifle include:

  • Compact size
  • Shortened barrel 14.5 in (370 mm), which includes the shorter carbine gas system.
  • Telescoping buttstock

However, there have been some criticisms of the carbine, such as lower muzzle velocities and louder report due to the shorter barrel, additional stress on parts because of the shorter gas system, and a tendency to overheat faster than the M16A2.

Accessories

Like all the variants of the M16, the M4 and the M4A1 can be fitted with many accessories, such as night vision devices, flash suppressors, laser pointers, telescopic sights, bipods, either the M203 or M320 grenade launchers, the M26 MASS shotgun, forward hand grips, and anything else compatible with a MIL-STD-1913 Picatinny rail.

Other common accessories include the AN/PEQ-2, AN/PEQ-15 multi-mode laser, AN/PEQ-16 Advanced Combat Optical Gunsight (ACOG), M68 CCO, grip pod etc. EOTech holographic weapon sights are part of the SOPMOD II package. Visible and IR (infrared) lights of various manufacturers are also commonly attached using various mounting methods. As with all versions of the M16, the M4 accepts a blank-firing attachment (BFA) for training purposes.

As for magazines, the M4 and the M4A1 can have 30-round box magazine or other STANAG magazines. Other types of magazines with different capacities such as the 100 rounds Beta C-Mag is also available.

In January 2017, a USMC unit deployed with suppressors mounted to every infantry M4 service weapon. Exercises showed that having all weapons suppressed improved squad communication and surprise during engagements; disadvantages included additional heat and weight, increased maintenance, and the greater cost of equipping so many troops with the attachment. In July 2020, the Marine Corps announced it would be ordering suppressors for use by all M4 carbines used by close combat units.

Feedramps

M4 feedramps are extended from the barrel extension into the upper receiver. This can help alleviate feeding problems that may occur as a result of the increased pressure of the shortened gas system of the M4. This problem is primarily seen in full-auto applications.

SOPMOD Block I

U.S. Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) developed the Special Operations Peculiar Modification (SOPMOD) Block I kit for the carbines used by units operating under its command. The kit features an M4A1, a Rail Interface System (RIS) handguard developed by Knight’s Armament Company, a shortened quick-detachable M203 grenade launcher and leaf sight, a KAC sound suppressor, a KAC back-up rear sight, an Insight Technologies AN/PEQ-2A visible laser/infrared designator, along with Trijicon’s ACOG TA-01NSN model and Reflex sights, and a night vision sight. This kit was designed to be configurable (modular) for various missions, and the kit is currently in service with special operations units.

SOPMOD Block II

A second-generation SOPMOD kit (now known as SOPMOD II) includes innovative optics, such as the Elcan Specter DR, Trijicon’s ACOG TA01 ECOS model, and the EOTech 553. Block II uses the RIS II rails manufactured by Daniel Defense in both a 9.5 and 12.5 inch length.

Variants

Except for the first delivery order, all U.S. military-issue M4 and M4A1 carbines possess a flat-top NATO M1913-specification (Picatinny) rail on top of the receiver for attachment of optical sights and other aiming devices—Trijicon TA01 and TA31 Advanced Combat Optical Gunsights (ACOG), EOTech 550 series holographic sights, and Aimpoint M68 Close Combat Optic (M68 CCO) being the favorite choices—and a detachable rail-mounted carrying handle. Standards are the Colt Model 920 (M4) and 921 (M4A1).

Variants of the carbine built by different manufacturers are also in service with many other foreign special forces units, such as the Australian Special Air Service Regiment (SASR). While the SASR uses weapons of essentially the same pattern built by Colt for export (Colt uses different models to separate weapons for the U.S. military and those for commercial/export purposes), the British SAS uses a variant on the basic theme, the Colt Canada (formerly Diemaco) C8SFW.

XM177E2

The XM177E2 was used in the military since July 1967 until 1994 when it was replaced by the M4. The weapon, however, was at its prototype stage, and it was used as a testing weapon to see how it can be used in combat. In 1966, Colt introduced the XM177, which was an improved variant of the CAR-15 Carbine. The Colt 609 was used by the US Army, the US Navy Seals, and the MACV-SOG, referred as the XM177E1. The USAF however used the Colt 610, which is referred to as the GAU-5A, which became known as the GUU-5P. The XM177E1 does have problems with weapon jamming, however it does have positive reviews, and some soldiers preferred the XM177 over the M16. Mainly because it was shorter, lighter, and easier to handle. In 1967, Colt adopted the Colt 629, which is known as the XM177E2. The XM177E2 has some improvements over the M16A1, and Is prone to jamming less than the older variants. The weapon quickly became a favorite of the MACV-SOG. In 1983, Colt and the US Army start making a variant of the XM177E2 that fires 5.56mm NATO rounds. In 1984, the new XM177E2 was officially referred to as the XM4, and the result will eventually become the M4.

M4 MWS (Modular Weapon System)

 
M4 MWS (Modular Weapon System) shown with various accessories including M203 grenade launcher, RIS foregrip, removable carry handle/rear sight assembly, AN/PEQ-4 laser system, M68 CCO reflex sight, and the AN/PVS-4 night vision optics

Colt Model 925 carbines were tested and fitted with the Knight’s Armament Corporation (KAC) M4 RAS under the designation M4E2, but this designation appears to have been scrapped in favor of mounting this system to existing carbines without changing the designation. The U.S. Army Field Manual specifies for the Army that adding the Rail Adapter System (RAS) turns the weapon into the M4 MWS or Modular Weapon System.

M4A1

The M4A1 carbine is a fully automatic variant of the basic M4 carbine intended for special operations use. The M4A1 was introduced in 1993, and was in service in 1994. The M4A1 was the first M4 model with the removable carry handle. The M4A1 has a “S-1-F” (safe/semi-automatic/fully automatic) trigger group, while the M4 has a “S-1-3” (safe/semi-automatic/3-round burst) trigger group. The M4A1 is used by almost all U.S special operation units including, but not limited to, Marine Force Recon, Army Rangers, Army Special Forces, Navy SEALs, United States Air Force Pararescue and Air Force Combat Control Teams. It has a maximum effective range of about 500 to 600 meters (550–660 yd). The fully automatic trigger gives a more consistent trigger pull, which leads to better accuracy. According to Mark A. Westrom, owner of ArmaLite, Inc., automatic fire is better for clearing rooms than burst fire.

In the last few years, M4A1 carbines have been refitted or received straight from the factory with barrels with a thicker profile under the handguard. This is for a variety of reasons such as heat dissipation during full-auto, and accuracy as a byproduct of barrel weight. These heavier barrel weapons are also fitted with a heavier buffer known as the H2. Out of three sliding weights inside the buffer, the H2 possesses two tungsten weights and one steel weight, versus the standard H buffer, which uses one tungsten weight and two steel weights. These weapons, known by Colt as the Model 921HB (for Heavy Barrel), have also been designated M4A1, and as far as the government is concerned the M4A1 represents both the 921 and 921HB.

Conversion of M4s to the M4A1 began in 2014, the start of all U.S. Army forces being equipped with the automatic variant. Though in service with special forces, combat in Afghanistan showed the need for providing automatic suppression fires during fire and movement for regular soldiers. The 101st Airborne Division began fielding new-built M4A1s in 2012, and the U.S. 1st Infantry Division became the first unit to convert their M4s to M4A1-standard in May 2014. Upgrades included a heavier barrel to better dissipate heat from sustained automatic firing, which also helps the rifles use the M855A1 EPR that has higher proof pressures and puts more strain on barrels. The full-auto trigger group has a more consistent trigger pull, whereas the burst group’s pull varies on where the fire control group is set, resulting in more predictable and better accuracy on semi-automatic fire. Another addition is an ambidextrous selector lever for easier use with left-handed shooters. The M4-M4A1 conversion only increases weapon weight from 7.46 lb (3.38 kg) to 7.74 lb (3.51 kg), counting a back-up iron sight, forward pistol grip, empty magazine, and sling. Each carbine upgrade costs $240 per rifle, for a total cost of $120 million for half a million conversions. Three hundred conversions can be done per day to equip a brigade combat team per week, with all M4A1 conversions to be completed by 2019.

Mk 18 CQBR

 

The Mk 18 Close Quarters Battle Receiver is a variant of M4A1 with a 10.3-inch barrel upper receiver. Current contractors for the Mk 18 are Colt and Lewis Machine & Tool (LMT) NSN 1005-01-527-2288.

Enhanced M4

For the Individual Carbine competition, Colt submitted their Enhanced M4 design, also known as the Colt Advanced Piston Carbine (APC). The weapon has a suppression-ready fluted barrel, which is lighter and cools better than previous M4 barrels. It is claimed to have “markedly better” accuracy. To improve reliability, Colt used an articulating link piston (ALP), which “reduces the inherent stress in the piston stroke by allowing for deflection and thermal expansion”. In traditional gas piston operating systems, the force of the piston striking the bolt carrier can push the bolt carrier downwards and into the wall of the buffer tube, leading to accelerated wear and even chipped metal. This is known as carrier tilt. The ALP allows the operating rod to wiggle to correct for the downward pressure on the bolt and transfers the force straight backwards in line with the bore and buffer assembly, eliminating the carrier tilt. This relieves stress on parts and helps to increase accuracy. The Individual Carbine competition was canceled before a winning weapon was chosen.

M4 Commando

The modern Model 933 has a “flattop” receiver, with a removable carrying handle and a MIL-STD-1913 Picatinny rail, with semi-automatic and automatic fire. The Model 935 Commando has the features of the Model 933, but has three-round burst fire instead of automatic. Though originally called the M16A2 Commando, Colt markets them as the M4 Commando around 1995.

Armwest LLC M4

In 2014, American firearms designer Jim Sullivan provided a video interview regarding his contributions to the M16/M4 family of rifles when working for Armalite. A noted critic of the M4, he illustrates the deficiencies found in the rifle in its current configuration. In the video, he demonstrates his “Arm West LLC modified M4”, with enhancements he believes necessary to rectify the issues with the weapon. Proprietary issues aside, the weapon is said to borrow features in his prior development, the Ultimax. Sullivan has stated (without exact details as to how) the weapon can fire from the closed bolt in semi-automatic and switch to open bolt when firing in fully automatic, improving accuracy. The weight of the cyclic components of the gun has been doubled (while retaining the weapon’s weight at less than 8 pounds). Compared to the standard M4, which in automatic fires 750-950 rounds a minute, the rate of fire of the Arm West M4 is heavily reduced both to save ammunition and reduce barrel wear. The reduced rate also renders the weapon more controllable and accurate in automatic firing.

Specifications

Mass 6.63 lb (3.01 kg) empty
7.75 lb (3.52 kg) with 30 rounds
Length 33 in (838 mm) (stock extended)
29.75 in (756 mm) (stock retracted)
Barrel length 14.5 in (368 mm)

Cartridge 5.56×45mm NATO
Caliber 5.56 mm (.223 in)
Action Gas-operated, rotating bolt, Stoner expanding gas
Rate of fire 700–950 round/min cyclic
Muzzle velocity 2,970 ft/s (910 m/s) (M855A1 round)
Effective firing range 500 m (550 yd)
Feed system 30-round box magazine or other STANAG magazines. Magazines with different capacities also available.
Sights Iron sights or various optics

Operators

Related Armament

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